5 tips to more sales

Making More Design Sales is About Building Relationships: Part 3

HandshakeIn Part 2 of this series, we discussed the second step necessary to begin building a relationship with a prospective client that will lead to making more design sales; that is, making a friend and finding out what is most important to your prospect.A quick reminder from that post: Every positive sales encounter eventually devolves to the relationship created between the salesperson and the prospect. A positive experience, that is, when a sale is made, is the result of a relationship that benefits both of you – and – as a professional, it is your responsibility to build that relationship.After all, the prospect has already done their part by coming to you (however that may have been done) and presenting you with the opportunity to make a sale, which leaves the next part of the encounter, building the relationship, in your hands.

Overcoming Objections to Buying

More than anything, objections to buying are about you – NOT your prospect. When you receive an objection, your prospect is telling you that you have not effectively managed one of the steps in the sales process: you have not built a rapport, you have not made them your friend, or you have not listened to them as they explained their pain points and their perceived solution.When this happens – do NOT give up – it’s simply time to start over.Imagine yourself walking down a hallway full of doors (client objections). As you walk down this hallway with them, address their concerns and objections, but be sure to “close and lock” each of those doors as you progress. Meaning, when you address the objection, make sure it is no longer an issue; make sure they cannot run back into that door. The nature of their objection will tell you where you took a wrong turn during the process sales process, letting you know where to go to get them back on track.To help you with this, you can ask a question such as, “Can we put this (the concern/objection) behind us?” Or, “Have I fully addressed your concern?” As you do this, make sure to read body language and listen intently to their tonality. (Of course, if you do this during the sales process, you’ll save yourself a great deal of time and stress when closing – but – this is a great tool for overcoming objections at the close.)You want to create a situation where, if they tried to run back down that hallway, every exit has been bolted down and all that is left is the obvious path… Your solution!Looking for more new design trends, tips, and ideas? Get in touch with TD Fall today.

Making More Design Sales is about Building Relationships: Part 2

HandshakeIn Part 1 of this series, we discussed the first step necessary to begin building a relationship with a prospective client that will lead to conversion; that is, building a rapport with your prospect that will lead to more design sales.A quick reminder from that post: Every positive sales encounter eventually devolves to the relationship created between the salesperson and the prospect. A positive experience, that is, when a sale is made, is the result of a relationship that benefits both of you – and – as a professional, it is your responsibility to build that relationship.After all, the prospect has already done their part by coming to you (however that may have been done) and presenting you with the opportunity to make a sale, which leaves the next part of the encounter, building the relationship, in your hands.Make a friend, if you hope to find out what is important to your prospectKnown among salespeople and sales trainers as “Qualifying”, questioning your prospect to discover their needs is a critical step in the sales process. However, few people like to be questioned in an obvious manner, which can make them defensive. Then too, in many sales situations, your prospect is unsure of what they are looking for – mainly because they have no idea what’s possible.However, if your concern for their welfare is genuine, your client will sense it and be more open to you, your questions about their needs, and your eventual solution or proposal.Remember, depending on the situation and environment, many of your prospects may fear “being sold” something they do not actually need. Of course, this is simply a euphemism; they actually fear that a good salesperson may “take advantage” of them. You ignore this mindset at your own peril for, even though you know that your intentions are honorable, the fear is very real for them. There is but one way to overcome this – be forthcoming and authentic with every prospect – while being firm within your own mind that your only goal is to help them find the best possible solution.Instead of simply “qualifying” your prospect, engage them in a conversation. Be empathetic and understanding. Get to know them to the extent they permit and pay attention to not just what they say, but also to their body language. Crossed arms and legs indicate resistance, as does avoiding eye contact with you. If you see these clues, relax your own posture and open up physically to them, in an effort to bring them along into a more relaxed frame of mind, and body.Most important, be genuine in your desire to help them find the perfect solution.Looking for more new design trends, tips, and ideas? Get in touch with TD Fall today.

Making More Design Sales is About Building Relationships: Part 1

Price is what you pay;Value is what you getWhat is “Making a Sale”?The answer to this question includes a bit of human nature… A sale is made when the value exceeds the price paid. That’s it. There is nothing more to add, and it doesn’t get any deeper than that. The human nature side of this definition is – people LOVE getting a value and, if you're the one who provides that value – they’ll also love you!“Price is what you pay; value is what you get.” This quote is usually attributed to billionaire business magnate, investor, and philanthropist Warren Buffett; but, it didn’t end there. He added, “Whether we're talking about socks or stocks, I like buying quality merchandise when it is marked down."Even a world-famous billionaire, a man who can afford to buy anything, enjoys a good value!Every positive sale encounter eventually devolves to the relationship created between the salesperson and the prospect. A positive experience, that is, when a sale is made, is the result of a relationship that benefits both of you – and – as a professional, it is your responsibility to build that relationship.After all, the prospect has already done their part by coming to you (however that may have been done) and presenting you with the opportunity to make a sale, which leaves the next part of the encounter, building the relationship, in your hands.If you're uncomfortable with that responsibility, selling is not for you.Start by quickly building a rapport with your prospective clientFear is a component of nearly every sales encounter; where the prospect fears “being sold,” rather than finding a solution. While such fear may be irrational to the salesperson, it is very real to the prospect and must be dealt with quickly and effectively, yet with subtlety. A sincere, well-intentioned greeting will enable nervous and fearful prospects to relax, making them willing to listen, which will reduce their defenses against being “sold something,” and make them more open to making a purchase.Many salespeople have been trained to greet their prospective client in a highly standardized, “Hello my name is… What is yours… Shake hands fashion.” In contemporary sales, this can be a dangerous approach. Since it is highly likely your competition has been trained in this cookie-cutter-welcome fashion, greeting your prospects in this way could make them think you are, “Just like the last guy,” they spoke with. The last guy they didn’t buy from.While you must, of course, welcome your prospects to your encounter, quickly putting them at ease, you should do so in a way which sets you apart from your competition. Do your research and perform your due diligence on your competitors. Knowing the style and approach of your competition will go a long way toward helping you set yourself apart from them. For example, a mildly humorous greeting can do wonders to help your prospect relax.That being said, knowing something of your prospect’s needs, in advance, may be just as important. If, due to the nature of the sales encounter this is impossible, beginning a conversation and exchange of information will be critical to your success. If you are open and honest from the very beginning, your prospect will be more likely to follow your lead.Your body language will often telegraph your intentions, as will the body language of your prospective client. Avoid folded arms and crossed legs; maintain eye contact in an open and curious fashion; reflect an attitude of warmth and concern; be forthcoming and positive, and – most importantly – be genuine in your concern for your prospect’s welfare.Remember, many of these hints to your client are only grasped subconsciously – which means you need to be fully conscious of them at all times.Once you’ve built a rapport with your prospect, it’s time to get serious about building a relationship, which we will examine in more depth in future posts.Looking for more new design trends, tips, and ideas? Get in touch with TD Fall today.